Furniture Stores



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There has been a tremendous evolution of the furniture store since the days immediately after the post World War II period. The stores that sold furniture in those days were comparatively smaller vis-a-vis the modern day stores. It was not uncommon to find furniture merchants conducting their businesses in tiny spaces that denied customers an opportunity to clearly visualize the attributes of furniture that they wanted. The limited space of the furniture stores was also a limitation to furniture merchants because they could not display all they had for sale to their customers. In the early days, some furniture merchants operated their businesses in space as small as 2,000 square feet of floor area. Another limitation of such scenario was that the merchants denied some furniture manufacturers a chance to have their products displayed in their furniture store. Although some stores which sold furniture were slightly larger, none was larger than 20,000 square feet until the period around mid 1960s.
Space limitations of the furniture store were transcended in part by their comparatively large storage requirements and practices. In view of this, furniture merchants stored most of their accounts in separate warehouses that were located in remote places. As opposed to urban areas that provided limited space for the furniture store, the low rent districts located far away had large blocs of storage space. Thus, furniture merchants used this opportunity to locate their warehouses in the remote areas while keeping few items for display in the furniture store in the urban areas. Hence, customers could view the displayed items and place orders, which could be fetched from the remotely located warehouses.
The adoption of the remote warehouses was a brilliant idea because either way (whether the furniture was available at the furniture store or at the remote warehouse) customers expected the merchants to deliver them at their places. In addition, since the customers did not expect the furniture merchants to deliver the orders within short durations, it did not matter whether the orders were delivered from the store that sold the furniture or the remote warehouses. The fact that furniture is a slow moving commodity made store owners widen their scope of operations.
They wanted to increase their sales but not necessarily with high prices since such a move could lower business. Hence, they decided to add to their product mix a diversity of fast moving commodities such as radios, television sets, lighting fixtures, lamps, enclosed cabinets and a host of other related products. The move also saw an increase in popularity of the remote warehouses, which now provided a wide spectrum of products. In addition, the store that sold furniture, which had traditionally been synonymous with all kinds of furniture, now became a store of a wide range of dissimilar products. The changes in product range ignited the formation of the modern structure of the furniture store. Today, most stores have large spaces where many kinds of furniture are displayed, but also have sections displaying a wide range or electronics and other products.

1 comments:

Ira Morse at: May 22, 2012 at 8:27 PM said...

You can even find furniture store online! their getting into technology this time. furniture stores are getting offensive with their marketing strategy for they now target non-local places.

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